Posts Tagged ‘Twitter’

Frenchwoman takes on Monsanto (An End to Corporate Food Fascism?)

June 25, 2009

It won’t be twittered today, because it’s not tiny-url immediately breaking news told in few bits of type.  But it deserves repeating that we all might want to educate ourselves about food politics in the longest war. And a Frenchwoman, Marie-Monique Robin, has shown the way.

From http://www.responsibletechnology.org/, excerpts from a report on Marie-Monique Robin, Director of The World According to Monsanto:  “… filmmaker Marie-Monique Robin has received 20 awards for her investigative documentaries filmed around the world. She is the recipient of the prestigious “Prix Albert Londres,” equivalent to the French Pulitzer, and … the Laurier du Sénat (The Senate Laureate, The Award for the Best Political Documentary), FIGRA’s Best Investigative Documentary Award, The Award of Merit from the Latin American Studies Association (LASA / United States), and The Critics’ Award at Cairo’s Cinema Festival, among others. Her book The Photos of the Century: 100 Historic Moments has more than 700,000 copies in print in seven languages.  Ms. Robin spent three years working on The World according to Monsanto, beginning with four months of intensive internet research examining declassified documents, leaked internal files, scientific studies, trial transcripts, articles, and first hand accounts of whistleblowers. The film actually shows Ms. Robin doing internet searches, identifying incriminating documents that are also available to everyone. She then takes us with her to four continents where she verifies the information and sheds more light on Monsanto’s outrageous behavior and impact. The film debuted in Europe in February 2008, and has since been shown in 15 countries and purchased by 20 international channels. Her accompanying book, which came out at the same time, became an immediate bestseller in French, and is being translated into 10 languages. The revelations in her film and book have generated a wave of anti-GMO and anti-Monsanto sentiment worldwide.”

This revolution for food freedom, Twitter isn’t covering.  Twitter can’t.  To talk about it requires more than sound bites.

Here’s the DVD cover you probably have never heard about [and its bottom-line cynicism that in the food phase of the longest war, the biotech giants — soulless companies required by shareholder investment law to make corporate profits (and not health of the people and the planet) their primary mission — cannot possibly have freedom-loving people’s best interests at heart]:

photo

Ms. Robin and I have not met, I’m no publicist and there’s no money coming my way for anything commented upon in this blog.  It should no longer astonish me — for Nemesis’ sake, I blog about hypocrisy in prevailing media-manipulated culture  —  when I check current news to learn (as I did today) about something amazing (like the work of Ms. Robin) that mainstream mass-and-social media in the US had not brought to my attention.

The greatest joy of blogging is the chance to share with others what ought to be communicated but usually isn’t.   Here’s also a picture on their terms of a couple of dogs (Luce and Lucky) who without need of the ASPCA have been good friends:

LATXcreatures 013

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Sarkozy, France’s Perfectly Imperfect President, Correctly Opposes Submissive Gender-Class Clothing Shrouds in Public for Women

June 22, 2009

Whether you like France’s President or not (and he does seem to think with his small head in his personal life), he has sounded the correct call for freedom in opposing political Islam’s efforts to impede the freedom of how folks think about equality with powerfully submissive images of shrouded women on public streets.

AP
  • AP Two women, one wearing the niqab, a veil worn by the most conservative Muslims
  • Jude Dude comment:  If my religion in America required me to  parade “my woman” around with pierced nipples showing (or send her out that way to shop for me), on the streets of the city  it would be (as it should be) against the law for public clothing.

See AP photo for comparison; then  ask yourself what kind of torturing male minds would invent such garb for women and dare to call Islam as politically practiced a religion of “love.”   One indication of political Islam’s sexual discrimination against modern women is that they must shop but swelter on a hot day inside their shrouds when less subjugated women are dressing down for the heat wave. See also the Twittered and cell-phone pictures of women’s dress on this blog from Iran’s version of man’s war against womankind.

If anybody wanted to dress up dogs like shrouded Islamic women on a hot summer day and have them parade around outside on an American street, the ASPCA would be all over it in all-American opposition to animal cruelty.

Hypocrites: They deserve no less than the spiritual invocation of Nemesis against this cruelty.  Even if women have been traumatized behind closed doors or mentally manipulated to their seeming compliance, when objectively viewed the practice of gender shrouding remains cruel.  See posts that follow.

More images of revolt in Iran: Fashion from women who are heroes

June 17, 2009

Does fashion precede freedom for some women?

We’re seeing freedom (and fashion) statements — from the nailpolish worn by individual women in some of the photos of the revolt in Tehran to designer handbags on display — also partial face masking plus  improperly worn head scarves, a punishable offense against women by the men who run political Islam. Images from Tehran suggest that forward progress of women’s global liberation may include steps through stages of self-actualization within the framework of what global culture currently supplies.

For women living under a religio-politico system of subordination by dress code (and chronic behind-closed-doors violence nobody witnesses),  any woman in public improperly wearing her male-required head scarf provides a  brave act of defiance in our world of cell-phone cameras and Twitter.    Some of the women pictured can afford Twitpic, they may Twitter.  They could probably afford (or somebody in their family afforded it for them) an education.  They can afford nail polish and designer bags.  When they revolt against the male-imposed veil, they revolt for women around the world who are required to comply by economic deprivation, threat and actual violence with their second-class gender caste status.

[Images from Wikipedia under “Hijab,”  “Abaya” and “Niqab” topics … there’s much more in the realm of imagery about political Islam’s dress code for women around the world, but why bum you out?]

[Woman with her son in Afghanistan, above, followed by two women under dress-code requirements on the Arabian peninsula  and a woman in Monterey, CA, USA]

In the facade for misogyny political Islam provides, it cannot advance anybody’s liberation to see a woman wearing political Islam’s required headdress — admittedly by the religion itself a symbol of male subordination of what men have dubbed as an “impure” womanhood redeemed through being masked in public.  That said, perhaps we outside Iran should consider whether we want to support women’s right to be free from religion, when every woman in question not only has no independent voice in the public sphere but we also cannot so much as see her face.

Maybe in some way of progression I do not fully understand as a guy with global male privilege —  maybe when teens outside political Islam “sext” their boyfriends with technology, when a woman in Tehran streaks her hair and improperly wears the head scarf in public, when women try to own the agency as actors of being “hot” — it advances women’s global liberation.

Maybe any fashion chosen by a woman — even if the available manufactured options tend still to objectify women as women, as a gender class — is still a  little closer really to being free.

Maybe it’s all steps of progress.  All necessary as part of the process of woman and women getting out of the male-dominance of being male-objectified targets in the longest war.

Twitpic Update: Twittering Today’s Iconic Images of the Spirit of Freedom in Iran

June 15, 2009

At Twitpic you can find a photo being billed on the proprietary site as iconic depiction of today’s protest in Tehran, green banner unfurled in the streets filled with a largely male crowd.
In the vast people’s outpouring of the Iranian revolt, wonder why you can see an injured girl attended by a male, a woman mixed in with male crowds, or a woman standing alone in defiance, among the  throngs  of  mainly men — but few groups of women among thousands (maybe more) of men who have taken to the streets in protest? See photos in Twitter, Tweetdeck post below, and these additional images:
Iranian Protest Election Results

Conflict between Musavi and Ahmadinejad Fans

Peaceful Demonstration after 2 Day Clash

Peaceful Demonstration after 2 Day Clash

Peaceful Demonstration after 2 Day Clash

Iranian women’s peaceful activist actions have, in recent months before the election, been fragmented by mullah-militarist men roughing them up and jailing them with a release condition that they be isolated from each other and no longer able to assemble.  It’s not being widely reported, but google Delaram Ali, Iranian Women’s Movement, One Million Signatures Campaign, Delara Darabi and Shirin Ebadi … and you may get the story.

Under the oppression directed against Iranian women by Ahmadenijad sympathizers, the women who are activists may believe this current uprising is their last chance — but because they cannot organize to tell us, and because Ahmadenijad is curtailing news from Iran, we receive no direct appeal from them.  Meanwhile, men are largely carrying most of the green banners without aid of women who have inspired the call to freedom in Iran over the past three decades.

The unreported story of today’s revolt is that Iranian freedom-loving women have been attempting — marching in the streets, singing and chanting slogans, organizing for freedom — for over thirty years to join with Iranian men to bring about social respect for individualism in community of the type most Americans take for granted. In those earlier years American feminist Kate Millett went to Iran and, before the Iranian government expelled her, gathered compelling material and with old-media (paper) photographic help from Sophie Keir wrote a book about Iran.

If the best of Kate Millett’s books weren’t currently out of print (no big surprise in a big-oil global mass-media world also run on the backs of women), we’d better understand political Islam (as compared to reformist efforts) and the dominator politics of what’s happening today in Iran.  Twitter and related apps provide excellent technology for showing what’s now (at least when a government doesn’t block tech egress) — but if we depart from the collective wisdom of where we’ve been, even a Twitpic won’t show the way to where we’re going.

Twitter, Tweetdeck and Getting Out Iran’s Pictures of Election Revolt

June 15, 2009

Get the full picture …”  because when we see truth with our own eyes, it’s easier to see through the longest war’s lies.  [As Tweetdeck and many others have said]:  “A picture tells a thousand words …”

As much as we like to use our words, the green leaves around a purple flower from a Tweetdeck page …

… say more about the robust life-force to grow, freely, than any indistinct text even if brought into focus.   Twitter and third party apps like Tweetdeck have gotten the cell-phone photos out of Iran about the mullah-led post-electoral suppressions of the people’s will to freedom.  Used this way, call technology my hero.  The dominator old men of the longest war’s portion in Iran may now have stopped even Twitter’s tiny url’s from getting outside the man-made lines drawn as Iran’s national boundaries.  But not before these images  emerged of the green of freedom adopted by women and men joining together as freedom-lovers in Iran.

  • The moderate Mousavi was identified before the elections (and resulting people’s revolt over the election being called a win by the previously ruling mullah-militarists of Ahmadinejad) as likely to beat Ahmadinejad.
  • Mousavi in outreach to Iranian women branded himself successfully as the green candidate – though the color did not reflect a commitment to environmental issues so much as progressive Islamic resonance symbolic of constructive change and liberation.
  • After what Mousavi’s supporters identify as rigged elections for the status quo, these images that got out indicate what we know about bravery and revolt in Iran (before the dominator government’s efforts at information blackout):

Iranian Protest Election Results

Iranian Protest Election Results

Iranian Protest Election Results

Iranian Protest Election Results

Iranian Protest Election Results